Antonov An-26B-100 PTK-251 crashed in the sea with 28 people

Kamchatka Aviation Enterprise, Antonov An-26B-100 (MSN 12310) crashed in the sea. Local media reports that AN-26B-100 has lost communication with 28 people on board. The Aircraft was flying from Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky to Palana in the Kamchatka Peninsula with 22 passengers and six crew members.

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Antonov An-26B-100 PTK-251 crashed in the sea with 28 people
Antonov An-26B-100 (MSN 12310)

The AN-26 registration RA-26085, flight PTK-251 was on approach to Palana, with the worst climatic condition. The airplane was unable to land at any of the airports and crashed in the Sea of Okhotsk.

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Air crashes in Russia

L-410UVP-E

Qries

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Seven people were killed on June 19, 2021, when an L-410UVP-E registration RF-94603 attempted an emergency landing in Siberia’s Kemerovo Oblast. The crew reported that one of the engines had failed. The plane was on a parachutist training mission.

Flight SU1492

Aeroflot aircraft 1492 made an emergency landing at Sheremetyevo International Airport in Moscow, Russia, on May 5, 2019, killing 41 of the 78 passengers on board. Flight SU1492 was on its way to Murmansk, Russia, when it returned to Sheremetyevo due to an electrical problem. The plane was a Russian-made Sukhoi Superjet 100 with the MSN 95135, registered as RA-89098.

Utair Flight 579

On September 1, 2018, Utair Flight 579, a Boeing 737-800  VQ-BJI, overran the runway and caught fire during landing in Sochi, Russia, injuring 18 people. One airport employee passed away as a result of a heart attack.

Saratov Airlines An-148-100B

On February 11, 2018, a Saratov Airlines An-148-100B airplane crashed shortly in Moscow, killing all 71 passengers and crew. The Saratov Airlines flight RA-61704, MSN 27015040004, was powered by two Progress D-436 engines and crashed shortly after take-off in the village of Argunovo, approximately 80 kilometers (50 miles) south of Moscow. The Antonov An-148 was on the way to the Ural city of Orsk. The wreckage and corpses were discovered scattered over a wide region. A subsequent inquiry determined that the disaster was the result of human error.

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